Planning To Visit London? You Might Want To Learn These Slang Terms

Buckingham Palace London, Photo Credit Deposit Photos.
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When Americans travel to London, it can be helpful to familiarize themselves with some British English terms and phrases that might differ from American English. Understanding these weird and wonderful terms will help travellers navigate daily conversations and interactions when visiting London. Scroll through to delve into a little English slang lesson and some backdrop pictures of London.

1. The Tube

Terms You Need To Know If Visiting London 8 Photo Credit Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos
Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“The Tube” is a commonly used nickname for the London Underground, the rapid transit system serving London and its surrounding areas. Londoners and visitors often use the term “the Tube” when referring to this iconic public transportation system if you are staying in London.

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2. Cor blimey!

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos

“Cor blimey!” is a British slang expression often used to express surprise or astonishment. It’s similar to saying, “Wow!” or “Oh my goodness!” It’s a fun and colorful way to react to something unexpected or impressive and is often associated with the traditional East London dialect.

3. Brolly

London Terms Umbrella  Photo Credit Deposit Photos.
Photo Credit: Deposit Photos.

“Brolly” is a British colloquial term for an umbrella. It’s a short, informal way of referring to this rain protection device. So, if someone in the UK asks you to grab your brolly, they’re suggesting you bring your umbrella because it might rain.

4. Oi, mate!

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Oi, mate!” is a casual and friendly greeting in British English. “Oi” is an informal way to get someone’s attention, and “mate” is a term of endearment or address, similar to saying “friend” or “buddy.” It’s often used between friends or acquaintances in a relaxed and informal manner.

5. Bob’s Your Uncle

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie.

“Bob’s your uncle” is a British idiomatic expression that is used to indicate that something is straightforward, simple, or will be successful. It’s often used at the end of instructions or explanations to suggest that if you follow the steps or advice provided, everything will work out fine.

6. Guv’nor

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Guv’nor” is a colloquial term in British English short for “governor.” It’s often used informally to address someone, typically a man, in a friendly or respectful way. It’s similar to saying “boss” or “sir.” It can be used to show respect or as a form of address in certain situations, especially in working-class or pub settings.

7. Dosh

London Terms Money  Photo Credit Deposit Photos.
Photo Credit: Deposit Photos.

“Dosh” is a slang term for money or cash in British English. It’s a casual and informal way to refer to currency. For example, someone might say, “I need to get some dosh from the ATM” or “I’m a bit short on dosh this month.” It’s akin to the American slang term “bucks” for dollars.

8. Quid

Pound, Money
Photo Credit: Deposit Photos.

“Quid” is a colloquial term for the British pound sterling (GBP) in British English. It’s the equivalent of the American “buck” for the US dollar. For example, “five quid” means five pounds, and “How much does this cost? It’s 20 quid” means something costs 20 pounds. It’s a common and informal way to refer to the currency in everyday conversation.

9. Queue

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Queue” is a British English term for what Americans typically refer to as a “line.” It means to wait your turn in a line or sequence of people, vehicles, or things. For example, in the UK, you might hear someone say, “I had to queue for quite a while at the bus stop” or “There’s a long queue at the checkout counter.” It’s a commonly used term when talking about waiting in line for various services or activities.

10. Sarnie

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Sarnie” is a term in British English for a sandwich. It’s an informal and friendly way to refer to a sandwich; afternoon tea is popular in the UK. So, if someone in the UK asks if you want a “sarnie,” they are offering you a sandwich.

11. Blinding

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Blinding” is a slang term in British English, often used to express enthusiasm or approval about something. It’s similar to saying “excellent,” “fantastic,” or “amazing.” For example, if someone says, “The Bonfire Night Fireworks were blinding!” or “You did a blinding job,” they are expressing that it was exceptionally good or well done. It’s a positive and informal way of showing appreciation or excitement.

12. Chuffed to Bits

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“Chuffed to bits” is a British English expression used to express extreme happiness or delight. It means that someone is very pleased or excited about something. For example, if you’re “chuffed to bits” about receiving a promotion or a special gift, it means you’re thrilled and couldn’t be happier. It’s a cheerful and colloquial way of expressing one’s happiness.

13. Taking The Mick

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie.

“Taking the Mick” is a British slang expression that means to make fun of someone or mock them in a light-hearted or teasing manner. It’s a way of gently ribbing or poking fun at someone without being offensive or hurtful. This phrase is often used in a playful or friendly context. For example, if someone is joking with you, and you respond with “Are you taking the Mick?” you’re asking if they are teasing or making fun of you. It’s a colloquial and informal expression. But it can also be used if someone feels you are taking advantage of them, as in, “Are you taking the mick?”

14. Mug’s Game

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie.

In British English, “mug’s game” is an idiomatic expression that means a foolish or unwise activity or situation. It implies that engaging in the activity is a poor decision or a waste of time, often with a sense of being gullible or easily taken advantage of. For example, if someone says, “Investing in that scheme is a mug’s game,” they are suggesting that putting your money into that investment is not a smart choice.

15. Pukka

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

“Pukka” is a British slang term that means genuine, excellent, or of high quality. It’s often used to describe something as authentic or top-notch. For example, if someone says, “This meal is pukka,” they mean that the food is delicious and of high quality.

15. Sorted

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie.

“Sorted” is a British slang term that can mean something has been organized, arranged, resolved, or prepared, depending on the context. It’s a versatile term used informally in casual conversation.

16. Cup of Rosie Lee

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A “cup of Rosie Lee” is Cockney rhyming slang for a cup of tea. In Cockney rhyming slang, words or phrases that rhyme with the actual word are used as a substitution. In this case, “Rosie Lee” rhymes with “tea,” so it’s a playful and traditional way of referring to a warm beverage.

17. Copper

Photo Credit: Sarah Christie Extraordinary Chaos.

In British English, “copper” is a slang term for a police officer. It’s an informal way of referring to law enforcement. For example, someone might say, “A copper stopped me for speeding,” which means a police officer pulled them over for driving too fast.

Also See, A Guide To Princess Dining At Disney World

Guide To Princess Dining At Disney World, Photo Credit Sarah Christie
Photo Credit: Sarah Christie.

Where you can dine with your favourite Disney Princesses in 2023 and enjoy Princess Dining At Disney World during your next vacation to Orlando. These are such magical experiences; little ones get the time to meet their favourite Disney princesses at one of the princess dining experiences at Walt Disney World. Enjoy a delicious meal and quality time with these beloved characters in a magical setting.

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New York with Kids, New York Public Library Photo Credit: Deposit Photos.
Photo Credit: Deposit Photos.

New York City, often referred to as the “City that Never Sleeps,” is a vibrant and iconic destination that offers an array of exciting experiences for travellers of all ages; this really is the best place in the World to be a tourist. From towering skyscrapers to world-famous museums, New York City is a treasure trove of opportunities waiting to be explored by families with kids.

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Elf Loctions in New York, Central Park © Warner Home Video
Photo Credit: Warner Home Video.

Elf Location to visit in  New York with the kids. Follow the steps of Buddy the Elf in New York.

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Sarah Christie is a craft, food, cruise, and family travel blogger Extraordinary Chaos, Cruising For All and Mini Travellers. Known for her unique perspective and ability to find beauty in chaos, Sarah designs and creates craft projects as well as creating recipes for people who want to cook from scratch the easy way. Whilst also exploring family travel and how to navigate it.

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